Latest Entries

Letter from a Reader

To the editors of con•text, While sitting here in rural Ireland, looking out of the window to the yard and the muddy lane beyond, I thought of your publication, and wondered why there hasn’t yet been some review of László Krasznahorkai’s Satantango, since it just won the Man Booker International prize, and may attract some … Continue reading

Literary Heritage

Literary Heritage

Kristin M. Distel on Debra Allbery’s Walking Distance In 1991, the University of Pittsburgh Press published Debra Allbery’s first collection of poetry, Walking Distance, as the winner of the 1990 Agnes Lynch Starrett poetry prize. Allbery’s youth, spent in northwestern Ohio, informs the majority of the collection and serves as a compelling backdrop to her … Continue reading

My Page to Submit

My Page to Submit

Emily Wilson on Bhanu Kapil’s Ban en Banlieue. There is a straight stretch of ribbon before you. There is a clump of charcoal. The ribbon is red; the charcoal—well, what is the color between black and gray without waxing too poetic about it? Is the ribbon tongue or tail? Is the charcoal dirt or purifier? … Continue reading

Feminism (n.): Distilled

Feminism (n.): Distilled

Micah McCrary on Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist. Idk I think feminism should be called something different like common sense or something. —From the Twitter of Tina Belcher I learned many things in graduate school that I should’ve learned much earlier on. Things that all men should learn early on, as boys. While I learned about … Continue reading

Investigating Mother(s)

Investigating Mother(s)

Kim Kankiewicz on Laura Lippman’s Hush Hush: A Tess Monaghan Novel Whenever I leave my son, Jack, home alone, we rehearse the rules before I leave: Don’t open the door if the doorbell rings. Don’t answer the phone, unless my name shows up on caller ID. Don’t go outside. Keep the doors locked and the … Continue reading

Tattoo You

Tattoo You

Kirk Wisland on Barrie Jean Borich’s Body Geographic Maps are the current rage in nonfiction. In the last few years we’ve seen an explosion of mapped essaying, from Denis Wood’s Everything Sings to Judith Schalansky’s Atlas of Remote Islands to Rebecca Solnit’s Infinite City. While some may see this as just another faddish fetishism of … Continue reading